Semiprozine Short Stories on the Locus Recommended Reading List

The 2009 Locus Recommended Reading list has been published. The following short stories from semiprozines made the list:

Clarkesworld Magazine

Fantasy Magazine


  • “Home Again” by Paul M. Berger, 3-4/09
  • “Lady of the White-Spired City” by Sarah L. Edwards, 5-6/09
  • “Butterfly Bomb” by Dominic Green, 5-6/09

Who are some of the best new writers appearing in semiprozines?

It is said by some that semiprozines are publishing some of the best new writers. Who are the authors people should be on the lookout for?

Robert Neilson, Albedo One

The Albedo One authors who have impressed me most in recent times are Philip Raines & Harvey Welles, Colin Harvey, Nina Allan, Julian West, Will McIntosh and David D. Levine (his story in Albedo One is far better than his Hugo winner). I have also been mightily impressed with Dutch author Teis Teng but unfortunately most of his work is in Dutch. You can find some of his work in English in a collection from Babel Books called Systems of Romance (he wrote half the stories). Modesty forbids mention of my editorial colleagues.

Beth Wodzinski, Shimmer

A year or so ago I would have called out Aliette de Bodard — but she’s already well on her way, and is a Campbell nominee this year. I think she’s right at the beginning of a great career.

I’ve got my eye on Angela Slatter and Shweta Narayan; they seem to me to be poised for really broad success, and are terrific. Also terrific: Becca De La Rosa, Alex Dally MacFarlane, Vylar Kaftan, Caitlin Paxson, Alex Wilson, Josh Storey, Claude LaLumiere, and Amal El Mohtar. Well, I think everyone we’ve published is terrific.

If I can call out a few artists, too: Chrissy Ellsworth, Sandro Castelli, Aunia Kahn, and Carrie Ann Baade are amazing.

Hildy Silverman, Space & Time

There are some great ones out there. Maurice Broaddus is a terrific writer who I don’t think the Big Three have published yet, but are bound to discover at some point. Aliette de Bodard is popping up in a lot of places, and has been nominated for the 2009 Campbell award. Oh, and keep an eye on multiple-workshop grad Larry Hodges, who is finally getting around to sending out more of his work.

Sean Wallace, Fantasy Magazine

Where to start? Fantasy Magazine has a lot of new, exciting talent, between what was published last year and this year, or soon to be published: Camille Alexa, Erik Amundsen, Stephanie Campisi, Becca De La Rosa, Willow Fagan, Berrien Henderson, Darja Malcolm-Clarke, Gord Sellar, Rachel Swirsky, Genevieve Valentine, and many more. However, the field is full of new authors being published all over, and the zines listed on this website are a great start for a reader to dive right into!

Scott Andrews, Beneath Ceaseless Skies

I think there are lots of very good neo-pro short story writers being published these days in semiprozines.  Beneath Ceaseless Skies has published a number of up-and-coming writers who’ve been Finalists or Winners of the Writers of the Future award, including Tina Connolly, Sarah L. Edwards, and Erin Cashier.  Our stories from other newcomers such as Matthew David Surridge and Grace Seybold have also received strong reviews.  And we’ve published two authors who are nominees for this year’s Campbell Award for Best New Writer–Tony Pi and Aliette de Bodard.

Starting Your Own Semiprozine (3 of a series)

I asked a few of our semiprozine editors and publishers if they had any advice for someone considering starting a semiprozine of their own. I was originally going to run these all at once, but it turns out their answers are best served separately. This installment is by Sean Wallace from Fantasy Magazine:

Run. Run as far and fast away as you can! However, if you’re seriously considering launching a semiprozine, I would advise doing thorough research on every aspect of magazine publishing, including the four p’s of marketing: product (print or online), price (fee- or free-based), place (distribution), and promotion. With those in hand, you should be able to approach this with a bit more understanding and preparation, but something to keep in mind strongly, that I have posted on my wall:

“I learned a long time ago that the two quickest ways of going broke are:
1. flushing your money down a toilet
2. running a small press
Running a small press is more fun, but it is faster—there’s always the chance the toilet will clog up and stop for a while.”

Please, before you go down this road, find out why you want to do this thing, and make certain that you’re comfortable with the time, energy, and expense that it’s going to take up. Yes, it can be a lot of fun, and rewarding, but only if your expectations are realistically met. Other than that, have at it!


fantasy2Fantasy Magazine’s first collection of fiction from their pages, Fantasy,  was published in 2007 by Prime Books.

Table of Contents:

“Goosegirl” by Margaret Ronald
“All the Growing Time” by Becca De La Rosa
“Somewhere Beneath Those Waves Was Her Home” by Sarah Monette
“Shallot” by Samantha Henderson
“Bone Mother” by Maura McHugh
“The Greats Come A-Callin'” by Lisa Mantchev
“Zombie Lenin” by Ekaterina Sedia
“The Yeti Behind You” by Jeremy Tolbert
“The Salvation Game” by Amanda Downum
“Sugar” by Cat Rambo
“Brother of the Moon” by Holly Phillips

Fantasy Magazine

Established: 2005fantasymagazine1
Editors: K. Tempest Bradford, Cat Rambo, and Sean Wallace

Fantasy Magazine
is a free online professional magazine, devoted to providing readers with a mix of features and fiction on a daily basis, all drawing on the broad wealth of sexualities, politics, and cultures in our world. The magazine has published stories by both established and up-and-coming authors, including Peter S. Beagle, Jeffrey Ford, Theodora Goss, Caitlin Kiernan, Nick Mamatas, Lisa Mantchev, Holly Phillips, Tim Pratt, Ekaterina Sedia, Catherynne M. Valente, Jeff VanderMeer, Marly Youmans, and many more.

In 2009 we’ll be expanding our coverage of fantasy entertainment and literature, looking to become a destination for reviews, interviews, and engaging, in-depth discussions of genre news. In addition, we’ve just become a SFWA professional market; inked deals to bring FM to readers through Fictionwise, Kindle, Mobipocket, PortableReading, and Sony editions; and, towards the end of the year look for our print anthology, Worlds of Fantasy:  The Best of Fantasy Magazine, edited by Cat Rambo and Sean Wallace.

Find out why Locus thinks “Fantasy Magazine is one of the most promising new publications to launch in the field in years” and what prompted Strange Horizons to say, “It is quite wonderful and very exciting.”

Awards and Recognition:
FM stories have enjoyed nominations from both Aurealis and Ditmar Awards; been listed on the Million Writers Award Notable Stories of 2007 list; adapted into a number of audio productions by PodCastle; and the website itself was’s Site of the Week, for February 13, 2008. Stories have been reprinted in The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror, edited by Ellen Datlow, Gavin Grant and Kelly Link; The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year, edited by Jonathan Strahan; and Fantasy: The Best of the Year, edited by Rich Horton.

Numerous honorable mentions  have been awarded over the years, mostly in The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror, but also in The Year’s Science Fiction, edited by Gardner Dozois, along with those listed as recommended by Best American Fantasy, edited by Ann and Jeff VanderMeer.

A number of stories have placed on Locus’s Recommended Reading List for 2006 and 2008; with others on the monthly Locus recommended summaries; and the magazine placed placed 11th and then 10th in the Magazine Category for the Locus Poll for 2006 and 2007, respectively.

Other Items of Interest:
Fantasy Magazine is published by World Fantasy Award-winning Prime Books, which is best known for publishing anthologies, collections, and novels by up-and-coming and established authors.


Information provided by Sean Wallace.