Weird Tales

weirdtalesEstablished: Originally founded in 1923; relaunched spring 1988.
Editors: Stephen H. Segal (editorial director), Ann VanderMeer (fiction editor)

Weird Tales has enjoyed a devoted following for many decades as the very first magazine of strange fantasy, science fiction, and horror. Founded in 1923, the pioneering publication introduced the world to such counter-culture icons as Cthulhu the alien monster god and Conan the Barbarian. Weird Tales is well known for launching the careers of great authors like H.P. Lovecraft, Ray Bradbury, and Robert E. Howard — heck, Tennessee Williams made his first sale here! — not to mention legendary fantasy artists like Virgil Finlay and Margaret Brundage. The magazine’s influence extends through countless areas of pop culture: fiction, certainly, but also rock music, goth style, comic books, gaming… even Stephen King has called Weird Tales a major inspiration.

After the original Weird Tales operation folded in 1954, there were several brief attempts to revive it during the ’60s and ’70s before the resurrection finally achieved full-fledged afterlife as a small-press magazine in 1988. Over the past twenty years, the magazine has featured works by such modern masters as Tanith Lee, Gene Wolfe, Michael Moorcock, Ramsey Campbell, Thomas Ligotti, and more. Today, Weird Tales has recommitted to its original mission — to publish brilliantly strange material that can’t be found elsewhere — even while bringing its unique aesthetics fully into the 21st century. In print and online, we look forward to introducing a new generation of writers, artists, and other storytellers who lure unwary readers into the shadowy places between dream and reality…

Awards and Recognition:
World Fantasy Award 1992: Special Achievement/Professional, editors Scithers & Schweitzer.
Year’s Best Fantasy & Horror: many Honorable Mentions over the years.
Bufo Rex” by Erik Amundsen, WT, #347 was selected for Fantasy: The Best of the Year 2008 and Best American Fantasy 2008.
The Difficulties of Evolution” by Karen Heuler, WT, #350 was selected for Fantasy: The Best of the Year 2009.
Current 2009 nomination — Hugo Award, Best Semiprozine, editors VanderMeer & Segal.
Current 2009 nomination — Prix Aurora: “All In” by Peter Atwood, WT #351.

Other Items of Interest:
Weird Tales has an active website that publishes original material ranging from fiction (web exclusives as well as print selections) to artwork (e.g. Steven Archer’s year-long Lovecraft series “365 Days of Blasphemous Horrors”) to nonfiction (assorted blog mini-series like the recent two-week-long Sandman 20th-anniversary retrospective). 2008 saw our debut Spam Fiction Contest, wherein writers turned email spam headlines into weird flash fiction. Learn more at our “2008 year in review” web page.


Information provided by Stephen H. Segal.

The Edge of Propinquity

Established: 2006edge
Editor: Jennifer Brozek

The Edge of Propinquity is a series of short stories from four different authors in four different universes exploring the world that lurks just beneath the surface of everyday life. It is the world of the unexplained, supernatural, magic, horror, duty, responsibility, black humor, conspiracy, unknown heritage and power. Each month, a guest author story is included in the literary offering. New issues are published on the 15th of every month.

Each year we have a new theme. For 2009, the theme is ‘compromise.’ In order to be accepted for publication, stories must fit the webzine’s theme and setting. The setting is a modern day story focusing on a character deep within the hidden world that surrounds mundane society.

Awards and Recognition:
Editor and Preditors 2008 Readers’ Poll: 6th Place Fiction Magazine, 15th Place Publication Editor

Other Items of Interest:
We buy 12 guest author stories a year.


Information provided by Jennifer Brozek.

Orson Scott Card’s InterGalactic Medicine Show

Established: 2005igms1
Publisher: Orson Scott Card
Editor: Edmund R. Schubert

A blend of science fiction and fantasy, emphasizing good old fashioned storytelling; fully illustrated, and published online, bimonthly. Stories range from short-shorts to 20,000 word novelettes, and include hard and soft science fiction, as well as high, urban, and contemporary fantasy. Also publish interviews with established and up-and-coming authors. The stories require a password to access ($2.50 per issue); however the magazine’s website also includes free book, game, and movie reviews, writing advice, and other free monthly columns.

Awards and Recognition:
IGMS stories have been reprinted in various Year’s Best anthologies. In 2008 we saw, “The Tale of Junko and Sayuri” by Peter S. Beagle, which will be reprinted in Rich Horton’s Unplugged (best stories published on-line); “Silent As Dust” by James Maxey will be in Rich Horton’s Year’s Best Fantasy; and “From the Clay of His Heart” by John Brown will be in David Hartwell & Kathryn Cramer’s Year’s Best Fantasy. Additionally, six stories published in IGMS in 2008 received Honorable Mentions in Gardner Dozois, and four more received HMs from Ellen Datlow. Previous year’s stories have been nominated for the Locus Award for Best Novella, and multiple stories have been on Locus’s Recommended Reading list and on the Top Ten list for the Million Writers Award.

Other Items of Interest:
Coming soon: IGMS forum.

Website: or

Information provided by Edmund R. Schubert.

Black Gate

Established: 2001blackgate
Editor: John O’Neill

Black Gate publishes epic fantasy fiction at all lengths, including novel excerpts, as well as articles, and reviews. We’re looking for adventure-oriented fantasy fiction suitable for all ages, as long as it is well-written and original.

The magazine publishes all kinds of fantasy. Nobody wants to open up a magazine, especially a big magazine like Black Gate at 224 pages, and read only one kind of fantasy, so we try to cover everything. Do we have a focus? Yes – about 70% of what we publish is adventure-oriented fantasy. Does that mean a lot of sword fights in fantasy? No. It means that we’re looking for stories with a lot of dramatic tension. A good, rousing climax. Something based on the basic rules set down by Aristotle two thousand years ago, the three acts of drama. You’ve got to have an introduction, introduce your characters. You’ve got to get your characters to a point where your audience is convinced they cannot succeed. And then they have to succeed.

We want fiction with a more exotic setting. Most of what we see has a very familiar setting. Generic Middle Ages. It starts off in a tavern with a ranger and a bard and a half-orc having a conversation. I want more originality than that. You need to grab the reader on the very first page. It’s tough to do that with character, because character needs to be developed. It’s tough to do that with plot, because any plot that’s simple enough to grab me on the first page probably isn’t complex enough to maintain my attention. It’s easy to with the setting. If you’ve got an innovative, dynamic setting, then you’ve got my attention on the first page. You’ve got my reader’s attention, and that works.

Awards and Recognition:
“Awakening” by Judith Berman was nominated for the Nebula and several stories have been reprinted in Year’s Best anthologies.


Information provided by John O’Neill

Fantasy Magazine

Established: 2005fantasymagazine1
Editors: K. Tempest Bradford, Cat Rambo, and Sean Wallace

Fantasy Magazine
is a free online professional magazine, devoted to providing readers with a mix of features and fiction on a daily basis, all drawing on the broad wealth of sexualities, politics, and cultures in our world. The magazine has published stories by both established and up-and-coming authors, including Peter S. Beagle, Jeffrey Ford, Theodora Goss, Caitlin Kiernan, Nick Mamatas, Lisa Mantchev, Holly Phillips, Tim Pratt, Ekaterina Sedia, Catherynne M. Valente, Jeff VanderMeer, Marly Youmans, and many more.

In 2009 we’ll be expanding our coverage of fantasy entertainment and literature, looking to become a destination for reviews, interviews, and engaging, in-depth discussions of genre news. In addition, we’ve just become a SFWA professional market; inked deals to bring FM to readers through Fictionwise, Kindle, Mobipocket, PortableReading, and Sony editions; and, towards the end of the year look for our print anthology, Worlds of Fantasy:  The Best of Fantasy Magazine, edited by Cat Rambo and Sean Wallace.

Find out why Locus thinks “Fantasy Magazine is one of the most promising new publications to launch in the field in years” and what prompted Strange Horizons to say, “It is quite wonderful and very exciting.”

Awards and Recognition:
FM stories have enjoyed nominations from both Aurealis and Ditmar Awards; been listed on the Million Writers Award Notable Stories of 2007 list; adapted into a number of audio productions by PodCastle; and the website itself was’s Site of the Week, for February 13, 2008. Stories have been reprinted in The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror, edited by Ellen Datlow, Gavin Grant and Kelly Link; The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year, edited by Jonathan Strahan; and Fantasy: The Best of the Year, edited by Rich Horton.

Numerous honorable mentions  have been awarded over the years, mostly in The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror, but also in The Year’s Science Fiction, edited by Gardner Dozois, along with those listed as recommended by Best American Fantasy, edited by Ann and Jeff VanderMeer.

A number of stories have placed on Locus’s Recommended Reading List for 2006 and 2008; with others on the monthly Locus recommended summaries; and the magazine placed placed 11th and then 10th in the Magazine Category for the Locus Poll for 2006 and 2007, respectively.

Other Items of Interest:
Fantasy Magazine is published by World Fantasy Award-winning Prime Books, which is best known for publishing anthologies, collections, and novels by up-and-coming and established authors.


Information provided by Sean Wallace.

Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine

Established: 2001, first issue published in 2002asim
Editors: Robbie Matthews: Senior Editor. Editorship for each issue is rotated among members of the Andromeda Spaceways Publishing Co-op.

ASIM’s mission is to support Australian speculative fiction, and to provide a venue for stories that sample the ‘lighter side’ of specfic. Although we’re an Australian magazine, we have subscribers worldwide (well, almost worldwide: we’re still struggling to crack the lucrative Antarctic market) and our authors are also scattered far and wide. A typical ASIM issue (if there is any such thing) will contain roughly equal quantities of stories by local and international authors, ranging from frivolous space opera to grim and gritty dark fantasy. We’re available in both print and PDF editions, and publish bimonthly. We’re a paying market, offering 1.25 Australian cents per word. And we’re justifiably proud of the reputation our slush-handling system has achieved – doing right by our authors, whether their stories make it into the magazine or not, is something we’ve worked damn hard at.

Awards and Recognition:
The three-hundred-odd stories published to date in ASIM have accrued the following awards between them:

  • Aurealis Awards (AUS): 8 shortlisted stories
  • Australian Shadows Awards (AUS): 3 shortlisted stories
  • Ditmar Awards (AUS): 1 winning story, 5 shortlisted stories, winner of a Best Professional Production Award, and also of a Best Professional Achievement Award
  • Sir Julius Vogel Awards (NZ): 4 winning stories, 9 shortlisted stories, and winner of a Special Award for Services to Science Fiction
  • …and we think there’s been a Tin Duck or several in there somewhere, too.

Other Items of Interest:
In lieu of payment, Co-op members receive virtual gold star performance bonuses, and staff discounts on interstellar travel.


Information provided by Felicity Dowker.

Space and Time Magazine

Established: 1966 by Gordon Linznerspaceandtime
Editors: Hildy Silverman (Editor-in-chief), Gerard Houarner (Fiction editor), Linda Addison (Poetry editor),  Diane Weinstein (Art editor)

Space and Time publishes short fiction and poems of fantasy, horror, and science fiction — particularly tales that blend any or all of these. Now in its fourth decade of continuous publication, Space and Time is proud to feature the work of new writers and established pros, as well as cover art and interior illustrations from some of the best artists in the field. Additional content, like Marvin Kaye’s Nth Dimension column, is available for free on their website.

In February, Space and Time began offering electronic subscriptions in PDF format. For those who already subscribe to the print magazine, the electronic version is complimentary.

Awards and Recognition:
Several honorable mentions in The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror, ed. Ellen Datlow, Kelly Link, and Gavin J. Grant, with the most recent appearing in the 2008 volume.


Information provided by Hildy Silverman.

Beneath Ceaseless Skies

Established: October 2008bcs
Editor-In-Chief: Scott H. Andrews

Beneath Ceaseless Skies publishes “literary adventure fantasy”–short fiction with traditional fantasy elements, such as secondary-world settings, but written with modern literary flair. We pay SFWA pro rate for short stories and novelettes of all lengths. We publish two stories online every two weeks.

Our authors include established writers such as Marie Brennan, Yoon Ha Lee, S.C. Butler, and Richard Parks, as well as new writers including five winners of Writers of the Future contest. Authors appearing in BCS have elsewhere won the Hugo Award (David D. Levine) and have been nominated for Nebula Awards (Charles Coleman Finlay), World Fantasy Awards (Holly Phillips), and the 2009 Campbell Award (Aliette de Bodard, Tony Pi).

Other Items of Interest:
BCS also publishes selected stories as audio fiction podcasts,
with a new episode every two weeks.


Information provided by Scott H. Andrews.


ansibleEstablished:1979, taking over from the former British SF newsletter Checkpoint.
Editor: David Langford

Ansible began as a subscription-based newsletter whose issues became fatter and increasingly irregular as circulation grew past 600. After a period of suspended animation from 1987 to 1991, it reappeared as a free one-page news sheet handed out at London’s monthly SF pub meetings (until 2001) and widely distributed by mail. The monthly schedule continues, unbroken.

Current availability: printed copies can be had for stamped self-addressed envelopes in the United Kingdom and via agents overseas: Janice Murray in the USA, Alan Stewart in Australia. Most readers prefer the email edition (circulation 3,500+) or the website — which, thanks to heroic rekeying efforts by volunteers, includes all the back issues and virtually every supplement and flyer mailed with Ansible.

Ansible prefers the quirkier aspects of science fiction, SF professionals and fans, and outsiders’ quaint or annoying perceptions of SF. The “Thog’s Masterclass” feature, showcasing “differently good” prose from our favourite genres, is regrettably popular. “Author Sells Book” and “Publisher Acquires Book” stories are generally banned unless they provide opportunities for the editor’s deplorable sense of humour. The rival newsletter File 770 wrote of Ansible in 1987: “As a newszine, it is the Emperor’s New Clothes”.

Awards and Recognition:
Ansible won the fanzine Hugo in 1987, 1995, 1996, 1999 and 2002. It was then switched by editorial declaration to the semiprozine category, which (frankly) began as a Hugo acceptance-speech joke but became a device to remove it from Best Fanzine. The unexpected result was a string of semiprozine nominations up to 2008 — though not 2009 — and a 2005 win in this category.

Other Items of Interest:
Thog’s Masterclass has spun off its own website at, but let’s not talk about that disgraceful business. Some favourite inclusions — articles and speeches by SF notables — are listed on the Site Map web page. I’m also pleased to have goaded people into scanning/rekeying every issue of Ansible‘s predecessor Checkpoint, extending the searchable archive of British SF news back to 1971 — and indeed further, because others have since done the same for the earlier newsletters Skyrack and Futurian War Digest.


Information provided by David Langford.

Abyss & Apex

Established: January 2003abyssapex
Editor-In-Chief: Wendy S. Delmater
Associate Editor: Jude-Marie Greene

Our mission is to publish the finest in speculative and imaginative fiction and poetry, with special attention to character-driven stories that examine the depths and heights of emotion and motivation from a broad variety of cultural and social perspectives. We want to publish powerful stories with emotion that resonates in our minds and hearts long after the first reading and makes us want to read them again and again. We look for the unique: stories that stand out in a genre that pushes the envelope of unusual. We take special delight in detailed world-building, and we enjoy reading about the realms and inhabitants of your imagination.

We have no subject/topic preference, beyond a requirement that the work have a speculative element. We are happy to read high fantasy, magic realism, hard science fiction, sword and sorcery, and genre-bending stories that don’t quite seem to fit elsewhere. Our tastes span the gamut from classic Golden-Age SF to modern nontraditional formats.

Awards and Recognition:
Since 2004, Gardner Dozois has awarded honorable mentions in The Year’s Best Science Fiction to ten of our stories. Honorable mentions have also been received in The Year’s Best Science Fiction and Fantasy for Teens (ed. by Jane Yolen and Patrick Nielsen Hayden) and The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror (ed. by Ellen Datlow, Kelly Link, and Gavin Grant.)

Tony Pi’s “Metamorphoses In Amber” was on the ballot for the 2008 Prix Aurora Award. “Snatch Me another” by Mercurio D. Rivera featured on the 2008 Locus and SFWA Recommended reading lists. There are three Rhysling Award nominations for A&A poems in 2008 (voting not final). In 2005, Greg Beatty won the Rhysling Award for his poem “No Ruined Lunar City” and took third place in the Dwarf Stars Poetry Award for “Prayer Causes Stars“.

Other Items of Interest:
On April 22, 2009 we will be releasing THE BEST OF A&A VOLUME ONE, Edited by Wendy S. Delmater, published by Hadley Rille Books.


Information provided by Wendy S. Delmater.